Jeremy Satterfield
Coding, Brewing and Tulsa Life

Viewing posts tagged django

Abusing Django Rest Framework Part 4: Object-level field exclusion

Similar to the object-level readonly field from my previous post, there are some cases where we want to exclude certain fields based on what object the user is trying to access. You could overwrite the views get_serializer method to use a different serializer based on their access, but if nesting serializers is a possiblility this get messy, somewhere in the neighborhood of O(n2). Another option is to modify a serializers to_native method.

Abusing Django Rest Framework Part 3: Object-level read-only fields

DRF has tools to control access in a few ways. Serializers make it easy to select what fields can be accessed and whether or not they are read-only. Permissions are great for restricting access to objects at all or even making certain objects read-only. But there are also cases where you might only want to allow access to a field on a specific object but leave that field restricted on other objects, or vice-versa.

Using Tox with Travis CI to Test Django Apps

Being a fan of good testing, I'm always trying to find ways to improve testing on various projects. Travis CI and Coveralls are really nice ways to set up continuous integration for your open-source projects. A couple months ago I finally started hearing grumblings about tox and how everyone was it using for their Python test automation. Every time I'd try to wrap my head around it, something always eluded me, so this week I finally decided to dive in head first and see if I could get to the bottom of it and how it could improve my current integration setup.

Abusing Django Rest Framework Part 2: Non-rate-based Throttling

Anyone running an API that can be reached by the outside world should most definitely be concerned that someone might pummel their server by making a massive amount of requests to that one endpoint that requires a bunch of on-the-fly calculations. Enter Django Rest Framework's throttling. It allows you to easily configure the framework to stop allowing requests from a user once they've made so many requests in a period of time. Whether you're concerned about requests over a sustained period of time or in short bursts, rate limiting with throttles will handle it.

Abusing Django Rest Framework Part 1: Non-Model Endpoints

When working with Django Rest Framwork a few months back, there were a few road blocks that we ran into. Rest Framwork is awesome with most models for providing a simple CRUD API, in any (or multiple) serializations, with authentication and permissions. Sometimes, however, things aren't so simple. Things get ugly. Framworks get abused.